Yliamne: the hope of Venezuelan mums for a family Christmas

“I have seen each of my children leaving me in every couple of years and I have realised, over time, that for me their journey in search of prosperity is a kind of transition. A process of transmuting hopelessness into faith and hope. I have lost the fear of distance. I belong to the populationContinue reading “Yliamne: the hope of Venezuelan mums for a family Christmas”

Nina: a re-encounter in Brazil after 10 Christmases in Australia

“For me, Christmas means family. Honestly, I don’t see Christmas as a super special date but it is a time to reunite with the family. I’m from a really small town, so all my brothers and sisters moved out to study and work and Christmas was real time of reunion. This is my recollection. MyContinue reading “Nina: a re-encounter in Brazil after 10 Christmases in Australia”

Gabriel Villalba: the certainty of a coup d’état in Bolivia

“What the world needs to know is that in Bolivia we don’t live in a democracy,” is one of the things Gabriel Villalba told me when we talked in a rooftop café in La Paz. From up there, there was a tranquillity that looked nothing like the streets we had just crossed to get toContinue reading “Gabriel Villalba: the certainty of a coup d’état in Bolivia”

The calls to my grandmother (and the certainty that she speaks my language)

I’ve been calling my grandma more often.  She’s always lived far away. But I never called.  Maybe because something in me always fed the hope that at the end of the year we’d see each other. And then I could give her the tightest hugs and lay my head on her lap while she strokedContinue reading “The calls to my grandmother (and the certainty that she speaks my language)”

“De Arepa en Budare”: Luisa and those who still resist in Venezuela

“Never, ever, even with the terrible situation we’re living in now, I would leave my country. I am Venezuelan, as we say here, ‘de arepa en budare’*”. It is one of the first sentences that Luisa tells me while we have a coffee at 6 in the morning, amidst the tranquillity of La Gran Sabana.Continue reading ““De Arepa en Budare”: Luisa and those who still resist in Venezuela”

Venezuela: A spark of hope in the middle of chaos

My time in Venezuela was short. I arrived one day and left the next. And I feel that I needed more to absorb the atmosphere of the country that, yes, is sinking into a crisis. But in contrast, have people who don’t hold their heads down.  I didn’t have the chance to stop for theContinue reading “Venezuela: A spark of hope in the middle of chaos”

Wence: “No one in Venezuela expected they would have to spend the holidays alone”

“Every year we used to get together as a family and have a massive party, with music, alcohol, and food. A lot of food. Heaps of food. I remember sitting to have dinner four times,” Wence Peraza says with the same enthusiasm of a kid who talks about what they have got for Christmas, asContinue reading “Wence: “No one in Venezuela expected they would have to spend the holidays alone””

Alba and the Venezuelan resistance in Brazil

“When I left [Venezuela], I said, ‘I will be the resistance in Brazil because I will have a voice and I will tell the world who we are”. One of the pioneers of the first Boa Vista Welcoming Centre, Ms. Alba Marina is certainly a force of resistance in Brazilian lands – and still offersContinue reading “Alba and the Venezuelan resistance in Brazil”

Alba e a resistência Venezuelana no Brasil

“Quando eu saí de lá [da Venezuela], eu falei ‘eu vou ser resistência no Brasil’. Porque eu vou ter uma voz e eu vou dizer pro mundo quem a gente é”. Idealizadora do primeiro Centro de Acolhida de Boa Vista, Alba Marina com certeza resiste em terras Brasileiras – e ainda oferece suporte aos seusContinue reading “Alba e a resistência Venezuelana no Brasil”

Roraima: The Complexities of the Migratory Flow

Dona Raimunda has lived in Boa Vista since 1983 when she moved from Manaus. Like many Manauaras, she “came to visit and never went back”. Her recount is complex and rich described in a way that only Roraimans can deeply identify with. In an informal conversation at the city’s Crafts Center, at first she complainsContinue reading “Roraima: The Complexities of the Migratory Flow”